Tag - Canadian

If your credit score is lower than you want it to be, let Canada Credit help.

How to improve my credit score to improve my lifestyle

How does a credit score have anything to do with how you live your life?

Your finances and score on your report matters because it all affects so many facets of your life. Ever had thoughts like these?

  • “Why can’t I buy products when I’m online shopping and not feel guilty?”
  • “Where is the cheapest gym membership?”
  • “If I took cooking classes, I could have my family over and be the one cooking for them for once.”
  • “I want to go out at night with my friends, wine and dine without checking my bank account the whole time.”
  • “New furniture for my apartment would be great.”

It matters whether your score is good or bad because you should be able to do what you yearn for in your own life. Though if bad finances are in the way, it affects people doing what they wish in their life.

With Canada Credit Cares, you can fix your credit score do you can live life the way you want to.

For a happy life, it should contain hobbies, things that make you smile and fill you up with joy. The Huffington Post has a list on how to be happy, with one that states to, “Spend money on experiences.” With money problems, it can be difficult to do that. It even goes into more detail on how exercising, developing your cooking skills, and spending money on other people can help.

Not having a high number for your score can affect your livelihood, employment, even transportation. But if you choose to make your credit better, you can improve your way of life, and have money to do the things you want.

“I don’t even have a credit card and no debt! I should be fine!”

Not having a credit card is not a positive thing. An article from Time goes into detail of why lack of credit is disadvantageous and could make you appear dubious to potential lenders. No visual trail, no way to see if you’re good with your funds.

But be careful! Too much credit and too many cards aren’t good either. It depends on your debt-to-income ratio.

Where to begin?

If you aren’t protecting and checking in on your financial information, start now. Canada Credit states in their credit protection information that according to The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, “… almost 16 billion dollars in losses directly related identity theft and fraud.” Do not let that become a reality for you.

Look at the credit score averages in Canada. It’s good to know the general idea of where it should and could be.

Get in the right mindset. Without the proper motivation, or if you put stress on yourself, no progress will happen.

What to do?

Check your credit report at least once a year. The Government of Canada states you should request a copy of it from one company, such as Equifax, wait six months, then request from another. TransUnion, for instance.

Pay your whole balance on time, every single month. Or do your best at keeping the number as low as possible, according to Experian.

Make a budget and stick to your budget! Put funds away so you can’t even see it and pretend it doesn’t exist. Calculate your spending each day on meals and coffee and look at the total at the end of the week. More than you may think when you picture it all together that.

Keep your credit and financial history as long as you can. If your history is short, less evidence exists to whether it is satisfactory.

Have multiple types of credit on the go. CreditCards.com states, “Consumers with a ‘mix’ of credit types on their credit reports tend to be not so risky than those who have experience with only one type of credit.”

We are not saying that a good credit score or money is the key to happiness. Though it makes life easier, and easier to do the things that bring us happiness.

 

 

Canada Credit cares about Canadians credit score!

How lousy are credit scores in Canada?

Averages in Canada, and when to think more about your score

Your credit score is your monetary portfolio. Every individual has a unique one based on their personal financial position and all that factors into it.

There is a numeric number between 300 and 600 to pinpoint a person’s score. The Government of Canada explains how credit ratings work in North America. They even delve into how being high on the scale means less liability and uncertainty for the company who is lending. Vice versa, a lower score means more risk.

Why does it matter so much?

Every person who has applied for credit or a loan in the past has a credit score. Everyone should know what it is. All the companies that handle your finances send information about your money. Your credit score can affect lots in your life; when you try to buy a house or a car, get a new job, or even take out student loans.

Equifax and TransUnion are the two big credit bureaus in Canada at the moment. There was a big security breach for Equifax earlier this year, so beyond knowing the score, you should take steps to make sure your finances are protected.

Money Sense states there being five main factors that go into determining each one based on, “payment history, outstanding debt, credit account history, recent inquiries and types of credit.” For example, factors such as whether you have a bad habit of not paying bills on time, or how much debt you owe versus your limit. Even how many accounts you handle.

What is a good credit score versus bad credit score?

According to the Huffington Post Canada, “The average Canadian scores around 600, with numbers in the 700 and above considered ‘very good.'”

Though the earlier mentioned Money Sense article claims the typical Canadian score is around 700, and, “Anything under 620 could affect your ability to secure a loan.”

A different point of view is being over 700 doesn’t matter because they are “a no-brainer” and will be given approval this article states from The Globe and Mail. But, the score may likewise shift in an instant from your actions.

With bad credit or no credit, Canada Credit cares about Canadians and getting their credit score where it should be.

How are Canadians doing?

Canada CreditCards.com shows statistical information from 2015 from Equifax, which conveys the most common rating was between 680 and 749. Canadians within that margin were 21.4%.

Those with the safest numbers (750 or above) were at 60.51%. Those under 520, or “extreme risk” were only at 2.85%.

Loans Canada delves even further into the numbers and states chances are doubtless a person with a score of 780 or higher gets permission for a loan. Though, “Individuals whose credit scores are less than 500 will not get approved for new credit and should seek credit improvement help.” In between those, there will be a higher interest rate because of the risk, getting loans won’t be easy, and individuals should look into repairing scores if under 579.

Want a comparison of those in the U.S.? Likewise, with 2015 info, an article from Value Penguin states, “The average credit score in the United States is at an all-time high of 695. Though different scoring models exist, which cause this figure to fluctuate by a few points, most fall between 660 to 720.”

Canadians and those from the U.S. are doing well on average! But if you want help, ways to approach raising your score are possible!

Do you think you need to make some changes to your credit score?